#imaginariumofdoctorparnassus fotos und videos

11 years ago today, ‘The Dark Knight’ was released to cinemas nationwide.
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‘The Dark Knight’ was the first billion dollar superhero film in history. It became the sixth-highest grossing movie in history, earning its fair share of rave reviews and Oscar nominations, and revolutionised the way critics and the public perceived superhero films. It was the first movie ever to be filmed with IMAX cameras. To this day, just over a decade on, ‘The Dark Knight’ remains the highest rated superhero film on IMDb and is rightly considered one of the greatest superhero movies of all time.
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Heath Ledger’s portrayal of The Joker proved so momentous that he was rewarded the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor at the 81st Academy Awards in 2009. He became only the second performer ever to win a posthumous acting Oscar.
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It is an honor to have had my city be the filming location for a large portion of this extraordinary work of art. This film will always be one of my absolute favorites. It is timeless and Heath’s performance will remain untouchable.
During the summer of the mid 1990’s, Heath and his friends would surf at Cable Station Beach, Perth, or when they could at Yallingup in between surfing sessions. Heath read about USA skate culture in Skateboard magazine. While preparing for ‘The Patriot’, Heath sketched out a treatment for a short film in his journal which featured a tribe of female surfers. So it was not surprising that he approached Director Catherine Hardwicke to take on the role of Derrick “Skip” Engblom.
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‘Lords of Dogtown’ explores the early days of skating’s history as it evolved from surfing culture. Surf hit the concrete sidewalk in the early 1970’s with a group of Californian skaters called the Z-Boys. Key members Stacy Peralta, Tony Alva and Jay Adams maintained their radical skate style in the empty backyard pools of Venice Beach in Los Angeles. Peralta wrote a film script based on their rise to fame and Catherine Hardwicke, who was a Venice Beach local, adapted it for the screen. Peralta (John Robinson) and Alva (Victor Rasuk) were the Lords of Dogtown with Adams (Emile Hirsch) as Top Dog.
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The skill and vision of Eliot Davis, Director of Photography, left an impression on Heath in 2007. While living near London’s Hyde Park during the production of ‘The Dark Knight’, Heath used a skateboard to film low angle shots of the rain soaked pavements. In another sequence, with the camera closely cropping his face, Heath used his skateboard to create tracking shots. Over the next few days, he edited the footage to the music of Nike Drake’s ‘Black-eyed dog’.
📷: Stephen Shugerman
Heath Ledger with the director of ‘Lords of Dogtown’, Catherine Hardwicke, attending the after party for the premiere of the film at The Avalon on May 24, 2005 in Hollywood, California.
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There is a scene in the 2009 film ‘Twilight’, which Catherine Hardwicke also directed, that she finds impossible to watch without shedding a tear. The emotional trigger had nothing to do with the storyline of Twilight or the acting of the young cast. The scene takes place in a rugged, forest region of Oregon and it was while scouting the location on January 22nd, that Hardwicke heard her beloved friend, Heath Ledger, had died. “We were in a van scouting," Hardwicke stated. “Someone's phone rang. They answered it and I instantly realized something was wrong with the reaction.” “It was very strange. The person said: 'OK, I won't say anything'. “I said: 'What was that about?' and they said: ‘We don’t even know if it is true. There’s rumors Heath has passed away.’ “Then one second later my cell phone rang and it didn't stop ringing." The director soon received confirmation the rumors were indeed true. “Everybody who worked on Dogtown called because they all loved Heath," Hardwicke said. “To all of the kids, Emile Hirsch and Victor Rasuk, Heath was their mentor. They all freaked out beyond despair.” “For me, I can't really watch the one scene in Twilight where I received that call. That's where I heard that news. It is my one little thing. My moment. To hear about someone you love, someone so magical, passing like that, was just crushing." 💔
📷: @wattsupphoto 
Heath Ledger photographed by Ben Watts in 2004 skateboarding the L.A. River.
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“He was just a great guy, a creative force and a great subject,” Watts said. “He definitely didn’t like to pose in front of the camera, so the pictures that we took always involved activities that he enjoyed doing—it wasn’t like a conventional photo shoot, where it was a pain in the ass for him. Because, while he was blessed when the good lord was handing out looks, that was not something that he liked to play, you know?”
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Captured here is a rarely seen side of the actor, skateboarding and goofing off on the concrete slabs of the L.A. River. Skateboarding was one of Heath’s better hobbies. In the summer of the mid 1990’s, Heath and his friends would surf at Cable Station Beach, Perth, or when they could at Yallingup in between surfing sessions. Heath read about USA skate culture in Skateboard magazine. This shoot will help with the transition into my next film subject. Any guesses? 🛹
—> I’m glad his daughter is keeping his godly skateboarding skills alive.
“Heath was an old soul in a young man’s form, animated, kinetic, masculine, capable in all things, yet uncommonly sensitive. A loyal friend and an adoring father, his least favorite subject was himself. He was always disheveled, unconcerned with his appearance, because, like my writing partner Larry McMurtry, Heath lived in his head. He was a pure actor, much like Larry is a pure writer, in that he believed his work should speak for itself. In all his endeavors, Heath was a risk taker with an insatiable curiosity: he loved surfing and skateboarding; he was an accomplished chess player; he was an imaginative photographer with an acute eye. Heath could be impatient and demanding, fidgety and exasperating, but then turn right around and be generous, endearing, painfully shy, humble. His evolution from teen heartthrob to his haunting portrayal of an emotionally straitjacketed rural gay in Brokeback Mountain–a performance whose tragic force will continue to touch audiences for years to come—gave us a mere taste of his potential as an actor. The great 20th century American poet Walt Whitman said it best: “Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, I am large, I contain multitudes.” - Diana Ossana
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She tweeted the first photo on what would have been his 37th birthday (4/4/16). The caption read, “Heath would be 37 years old. So lucky to have worked with you and called you [a] dear friend. Will miss you forever.”
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Diana Ossana is an American writer who has collaborated on writing screenplays, teleplays, and novels with author Larry McMurtry since they first worked together in 1992. She won an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, a Writers' Guild of America Award, a BAFTA Award and a Golden Globe Award for her screenplay of Ang Lee's Brokeback Mountain. Ossana, a producer on the film, also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Drama and a Best Film award (shared with James Schamus) for Best Film.